Thursday, June 18, 2015

EXTRACT YOUR OWN DNA




Humanities and the Sciences





EXTRACT YOUR OWN DNA



Originally posted on Noughty Science:


Do you want to see your own DNA using ingredients that you can find in your kitchen?



DNA



Follow this simple steps to extract and see your DNA:



http://www.planet-science.com/categories/experiments/biology/2012/03/extract-your-own-dna.aspx


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Sunday, May 17, 2015

Opening Up Open Access Beyond the Sciences: Learning from the Open Library of Humanities




Humanities and the Sciences





Opening Up Open Access Beyond the Sciences: Learning from the Open Library of Humanities



Dr. Caroline Edwards describes the origins, motivations, and strategies of the Open Library of Humanities:



This site aims to give the background to, and rationale for, our vision of building a low cost, sustainable, Open Access future for the humanities.”


Tagged: Complexity, Digital Humanities, Open Access






Saturday, May 16, 2015

Collections Volunteering: The Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum




Humanities and the Sciences





Collections Volunteering: The Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum



“The Smith has for a number of years encouraged volunteering as part of our collections cataloguing and research efforts particularly for those interested in a career in the cultural sector. Volunteers are provided with a basic training in all aspects of curatorial work and set tasks, projects and lecturing opportunities, if time permits.” (Continued in Collections Volunteering.)


Tagged: Mediation, Volunteering






Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Smashing the Gates of Academic Discourse: Part 1




Humanities and the Sciences





Smashing the Gates of Academic Discourse: Part 1



Originally posted on Do-It-Yourself Library Instruction:


Can you just show them the databases?  This is a phrase I’ve heard a lot as an instruction librarian.



I’ve thought about it, and the answer is no.  I cannot just show them the databases.



Entering the Databases Figure 1: An uncertain student encounters the magnitude of academic discourse through a library database.



I cannot “just” show them the databases because there are so many layers of destruction inherent in my process of pointing, clicking, and narrating.  I am not demonstrating how students can find a scholarly article, I am demonstrating how profoundly students are marginalized from academic knowledge production.  I am not identifying aspects of peer review, I am silencing all non-academic voices–including the students’.  I am not modeling good search strategies, I am erasing myself as a teacher.



Databases embody the exclusionary nature of academic discourse.  Students are on the outside, in search boxes, using natural language that the database most likely won’t…


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Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Musei Capitolini




Humanities and the Sciences





Musei Capitolini



Vieni a scoprire i protagonisti della storia e i più affascinanti simboli della città nel museo più antico al mondo.


(Come to find out the protagonists of history and the most fascinating symbols of the city in the museum oldest in the world.)


Tagged: Art, History, Italian Renaissance, Museums, Rome






Thursday, April 30, 2015

Caitlin Green: Thanet, Tanit and the Phoenicians: Place-Names, Ar...

Caitlin Green: Thanet, Tanit and the Phoenicians: Place-Names, Ar...: Recent work suggests that the name of the easternmost part of Kent, the Isle of Thanet, is one that is of considerable potential interest, p...